Posts Tagged ‘ miscarriage of justice ’


MOJ budgets aren’t even for Christmas!

Written by admin
December 1st, 2018

Recent calculations have shown that the MOJ’s annual budget amounted to less than four days’ worth or four 365th’s of the DWP’s government allowance.

If the two departments start spending their annual budgets at midnight on New Year’s Eve at an equal rate, the MOJ will be spent up two days before the twelfth night arrives.

There can be no doubting that both departments have vital jobs to play. There can be no doubting that the call on the DWP is a much stronger one than on the MOJ, but these exciting statistics show just how small that Ministry of Justice budget really is.

Enough money to allow an equal spend for the length of your average Premiership football match would be enough to allow for an enormous improvement in the working conditions of all within the justice system.

An increase in the MOJ budget to allow an equal spend for time equivalent to one episode of Prime Suspect would be enough to ensure the proper and timely investigation of all cases presented to the Crown Prosecution Service in a twelve month period.

An increase in the MOJ budget sufficient to allow Nick Grimshaw to play three songs on his afternoon show would be enough to see a dramatic percentage increase in the legal aid budget which would allow for recruitment and retention of staff and a sensible working week for all defence lawyers.

As we approach the time for drawing up our Christmas lists for Santa, are any of the above really too much to ask for?

Lock ups and Lock outs

Written by admin
November 19th, 2018

In a desperate attempt to save Her Majesty’s government a few extra ill-gotten pounds, the MOJ are now consulting on closing the remand courts in Doncaster, Barnsley, Beverly and Grimsby. The only remand courts in South Yorkshire and to the whole of Humberside, would be in Sheffield and Hull.

On the face of it, the considerable expense involved in refurbishments at Barnsley and Doncaster and the installation of video links at all three courts now seems to be for nothing.

The travel to be imposed on families and friends, who want to be present for vital first hearings, subsequent bail applications and hugely important sentencings are a cost that will now have to be met by the poorest members of society rather than the government through the justice system.

If there is anything that can be done to avoid the alienation and injustice that these sorts of closures bring we, at The Johnson Partnership, want to help to do it. We have long felt that it is time that the justice system operated for the benefit of those defendants, the complainants and witnesses who find themselves unwittingly involved in it, rather than its administrators and overlords.

 

STUMBLING CPS GIVEN A LEG UP BY MOJ

Written by Sian Hall
February 16th, 2018

In recent times it has become apparent that many cases are either failing or being brought to court late as a result of difficulties and deficiencies within the Crown Prosecution Service.

This week, the Today programme was told that over 900 cases have failed in the course of last year because of lack of disclosure. Repeatedly, courts see charges being laid that do not match the facts leaving cases apparently under or over prosecuted. Time and again the Crown Prosecution Service rely on the courts to sort out the difficulties.

It has recently become apparent that a substantial budgetary increase has been afforded to the Crown Prosecution Service to enable them to recruit staff nationwide. Promises of rising pay scales and advantageous pensions are being dangled to lure lawyers on board.

The reality is of course is that most lawyers who are in a position to join the Crown Prosecution Service will either come from the independent bar or the defence community. By offering newly revamped salary packages, the Crown Prosecution Service inevitably put a strain on the defence community by drawing in-house some experienced defenders who are looking for a life without on-call commitments and day to day contact with some particularly difficult clients.

These defence services have struggled to recruit, fighting a losing battle against employers in the civil, commercial, private client, and even family areas, where instant fees can be significantly greater than those available to the average defence firm.

Whilst skewing the marketplace and slanting the playing field in the way that they are doing, the MOJ simply bring more stresses and problems to a different part of the criminal justice process. An equal distribution of funds between the Crown Prosecution Service and the defence community would obviously seem the more appropriate way of ensuring that the entire sector is well staffed. Instead of this, the MOJ have sought to impose a further legal aid cut on the very firms keeping the system afloat.

The only good news is that retention amongst Crown Prosecution Service staff, including those who have joined in the last three to six months, is poor. The lack of job satisfaction, the factory mentality, the lack of thanks and appreciation and the poor morale etc, within the Crown Prosecution Service have seen a number of new joiners leave forthwith, with some of them asking to return to their former posts.

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